alq 08 TP5 - Inc, Active Learning s For use with Classroom Response Systems

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  • 1.© 2013 Pearson Education, Inc. Active Learning Lecture Slides For use with Classroom Response Systems Introductory Statistics: Exploring the World through Data, 1e by Gould and Ryan Chapter 8:Hypothesis Testing for Population Proportions Slide 8 - 1
  • 2.True or FalseHypotheses are always statements about sample statistics. True False Slide 8 - 2 © 2013 Pearson Education, Inc.
  • 3.True or FalseThe null hypothesis, which we write H0 is the conservative, status-quo, business-as- usual statement about a population parameter. True False Slide 8 - 3 © 2013 Pearson Education, Inc.
  • 4.True or FalseThe alternative hypothesis, Ha , is the research hypothesis. It is usually a statement about the value of a parameter that we hope to demonstrate is true. True False Slide 8 - 4 © 2013 Pearson Education, Inc.
  • 5.True or FalseThe null hypothesis always gets the benefit of the doubt and is assumed to be true throughout the hypothesis-testing procedure. True False Slide 8 - 5 © 2013 Pearson Education, Inc.
  • 6.True or FalseDuring hypothesis testing, if we decide at the last step that the observed outcome is extremely unusual under this assumption, then and only then do we reject the null hypothesis. True False Slide 8 - 6 © 2013 Pearson Education, Inc.
  • 7.True or FalseIn this book, the null hypothesis always has an equals sign, no matter which alternative hypothesis is used. True False Slide 8 - 7 © 2013 Pearson Education, Inc.
  • 8.The probability of rejecting the null hypothesis when, in fact, the null hypothesis is true is called the standard error p-value power of the test significance level Slide 8 - 8 © 2013 Pearson Education, Inc.
  • 9.There are three basic pairs of hypotheses. The two-tailed test has the following hypotheses: H0: p = p0 and Ha: p < p0 H0: p = p0 and Ha: p ≠ p0 H0: p = p0 and Ha: p > p0 H0: p ≠ p0 and Ha: p = p0 Slide 8 - 9 © 2013 Pearson Education, Inc.
  • 10.There are three basic pairs of hypotheses. The one-tailed (left) test has the following hypotheses: H0: p = p0 and Ha: p < p0 H0: p = p0 and Ha: p ≠ p0 H0: p = p0 and Ha: p > p0 H0: p ≠ p0 and Ha: p = p0 Slide 8 - 10 © 2013 Pearson Education, Inc.
  • 11.There are three basic pairs of hypotheses. The one-tailed (right) test has the following hypotheses: H0: p = p0 and Ha: p < p0 H0: p = p0 and Ha: p ≠ p0 H0: p = p0 and Ha: p > p0 H0: p ≠ p0 and Ha: p = p0 Slide 8 - 11 © 2013 Pearson Education, Inc.
  • 12.True or FalseYou should always draw a sketch before you compute the p-value, even if you use technology (as we strongly recommend) to find the probability. True False Slide 8 - 12 © 2013 Pearson Education, Inc.
  • 13.Which of the following value(s) for the significance level, α, is/are considered acceptably small? 0.01 0.05 0.10 All of the above Slide 8 - 13 © 2013 Pearson Education, Inc.
  • 14.True or FalseA test statistic compares our observed outcome to the alternative hypothesis. True False Slide 8 - 14 © 2013 Pearson Education, Inc.
  • 15.True or FalseIf the null hypothesis is true, then the z-statistic will be close to 0. Therefore, the farther the z-statistic is from 0, the more the null hypothesis is discredited. True False Slide 8 - 15 © 2013 Pearson Education, Inc.
  • 16.Assuming the null hypothesis is true, which of the following is the probability that if the experiment were repeated, you would get a test statistic as extreme as or more extreme than the one you actually got? α-level z-statistic p-value power Slide 8 - 16 © 2013 Pearson Education, Inc.
  • 17.True or FalseA small p-value suggests that a surprising outcome has occurred and discredits the null hypothesis. True False Slide 8 - 17 © 2013 Pearson Education, Inc.
  • 18.True or FalseUnder the appropriate conditions, the sampling distribution of the z-statistic is approximately a standard normal distribution, N(0, 1). True False Slide 8 - 18 © 2013 Pearson Education, Inc.
  • 19.True or FalseExtreme values are rare in a N(0, 1) distribution, so if we see an extreme value, it is evidence that the null hypothesis is true. True False Slide 8 - 19 © 2013 Pearson Education, Inc.
  • 20.To achieve a significance level of α, if the p-value is less than (or equal to) α, then reject the null hypothesis accept the null hypothesis do not reject the null hypothesis accept the alternative hypothesis Slide 8 - 20 © 2013 Pearson Education, Inc.
  • 21.To achieve a significance level of α, if the p-value is greater than α, then reject the null hypothesis accept the null hypothesis do not reject the null hypothesis accept the alternative hypothesis Slide 8 - 21 © 2013 Pearson Education, Inc.
  • 22.In order to compare proportions from two populations, we write the null hypothesis as H0: p1 = p2 H0: p1 < p2 H0: p1 > p2 H0: p1 ≠ p2 Slide 8 - 22 © 2013 Pearson Education, Inc.
  • 23.True or FalseThe results of a study are said to have been replicated when researchers using new subjects come to the same conclusion. True False Slide 8 - 23 © 2013 Pearson Education, Inc.
  • 24.Which of the following is/are instances for which conditions fail to be met? the sample size is too small the samples are not independent the sample is not randomly selected All of the above Slide 8 - 24 © 2013 Pearson Education, Inc.
  • 25.The power depends on which of the following factors? just how wrong the null hypothesis is the sample size the significance level All of the above Slide 8 - 25 © 2013 Pearson Education, Inc.
  • 26.True or FalseWe cannot make the significance level arbitrarily small because doing so lowers the power—the probability that we will correctly reject the null hypothesis. True False Slide 8 - 26 © 2013 Pearson Education, Inc.
  • 27.True or FalseThe results of a study are said to have been replicated when researchers using new subjects come to the same conclusion. True False Slide 8 - 27 © 2013 Pearson Education, Inc.
  • 28.True or FalseStatistically significant findings always mean that the results are useful. True False Slide 8 - 28 © 2013 Pearson Education, Inc.
  • 29.True or FalseDon’t say you “proved” something with statistics. True False Slide 8 - 29 © 2013 Pearson Education, Inc.
  • 30.True or FalseIn hypothesis testing, it is perfectly reasonable to say that you “accept the null hypothesis.” True False Slide 8 - 30 © 2013 Pearson Education, Inc.
  • 31.Don’t say you “accept the null hypothesis”; say, rather that you cannot reject the null hypothesis failed to reject the null hypothesis there is insufficient evidence to reject the null hypothesis All of the above Slide 8 - 31 © 2013 Pearson Education, Inc.