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  • 1.Improving educationfor all students
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  • 4.“Every child deserves an education that will prepare her for the future. … Yes, knowledge matters, but not in a vacuum. It has to be connected with inquiry and problem solving. … Fluency with critical thinking, readiness for life-long learning— that's what will matter. That’s what my wife and I want for our children.” — U.S. Secretary of Education Arne Duncan
  • 5.“[Young people] will continue to need basic knowledge … But they will need skills and motivation even more. … Young people who are intrinsically motivated— curious, persistent, and willing to take risks—will learn new knowledge and skills continuously. They will be able to find new opportunities or create their own—a disposition that will be increasingly important as many traditional careers careers disappear.” — Tony Wagner, Harvard University
  • 6.The good news:America’s progressin improving education
  • 7.What we know & where we need to go All students need and deserve the opportunity to learn and to be successful. We are facing a seminal moment in public education: for the first time in our nation’s history, America's public schools enroll a majority-minority student body. Our collective future depends on meeting the needs of all students—particularly those historically underserved and most vulnerable—better. The U.S. Department of Education is working with states, systems, and leaders to raise standards across the Pre-K–12 spectrum; increase access to high-quality preschool; improve teaching; establish strong systems for technology and data; turn around persistently underachieving K-12 schools; and increase college access, affordability, quality, and completion. 7
  • 8.8 Nearly 30 states increase investments in & improve state policies on early learning Progress: Policy
  • 9.Progress: great gains Students’ test scores are one way to measure progress—and they’re going up—especially on the highly reliable National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP). In 2013, our nation’s elementary and middle school students earned the highest math and reading scores in history. Some of the greatest gains have been in states that volunteered for the Race to the Top grant program and stayed most committed to change efforts, especially Tennessee and Washington, D.C. Results driven by reform 9
  • 10.Progress: results for students 10 The highest high school graduation rate in u.s. history
  • 11.Progress: results for students Dropout rates decreasing 11
  • 12.Progress: results for students Highest 4th and 8th grade scores ever on nation’s report card 12 National Assessment of Educational Progress – Math, 1990-2013
  • 13.Progress: results for students More Hispanic and African-American students graduating 13 High school graduation rates: School years 2002-2003 through 2011-2012
  • 14.Progress: results for students 14 More students attending college on pell grants million 6 million 8.9 million
  • 15.Progress: results for Students College enrollment 15 The amount of additional black and Hispanic students in college now than in 2008 1.1 million
  • 16.Progress: results for students More Hispanic and african-american students attending college 16 Enrollment Rates of 18 to 24-year-olds
  • 17.the challenges ahead
  • 18.The challenge: Too Few low-income students complete high school 18 63% 96%
  • 19.The challenge: Only 29 percent of low-income students go to college 19 29% 80%
  • 20.The challenge: Only 14 percent of low-income students complete college 20 60.7% 14.5%
  • 21.The challenge: 21 The link between parents’ educational attainment & their children’s early vocabulary development
  • 22.The Challenge: Suspension rates for preschool children are uneven and unacceptable across the country. Black students represent 18 percent of preschool enrollment but 42 percent of students suspended once, and 48 percent of students suspended more than once. Disparities in school discipline 22
  • 23.The challenge: 23 Disparities in school discipline Percent of students receiving out-of-school suspensions by gender and race, 2009-2010 10%
  • 24.The challenge: 24 Disparities in advanced coursework
  • 25.The challenge: Nationwide, between 10-25 percent of high schools do not offer more than one of the core courses in the typical sequence of high school math and science learning—such as Algebra I and II, geometry, biology, and chemistry. Nationwide, only 50 percent of high schools offer calculus, and only 63 percent offer physics. Access to challenging coursework 25
  • 26.The challenge: A recent study of the computer science Advanced Placement test found that in 11 states no African-American students took the exam; in eight states, no Hispanic students did. Access to challenging coursework 26
  • 27.The challenge: 27 Disparities in high school graduation
  • 28.Our standing is slipping Results on international academic tests 28 2012 Average PISA Scores - Mathematics
  • 29.Our standing is slipping Results on International assessments of adult skills 29 Average PIAAC Literacy Scores U.S. score is lower than international average
  • 30.Our standing is slipping 30 Percent of non-employed young adults, 25-34 years old
  • 31.“The United States… has lost its once-large lead in producing college graduates, and education remains the most successful jobs strategy in a globalized, technology-heavy economy.” — The New York Times
  • 32.The innovation challenge American education has a two-part innovation challenge: Many new interventions produce only incremental improvement over the status quo leaving outcomes and the lives of teachers, families, and students, practically unchanged. Many of the most promising and impactful solutions never achieve scale. We need new solutions that shatter today’s status quo. To have impact, solutions must scale to serve millions of students and teachers—or large portions of specific, underserved populations. 32 Innovation is more than a “shiny new object”
  • 33.ensuring America’s promise: federal efforts in education
  • 34.Federal priorities: 34 Access | Equity | Quality | Outcomes Research | Operations | Enforcement School/Community Safety and Climate Immigration/DREAM Act Ladders of Opportunity College & Career Readiness for All HHS Partnership Preschool for All K12: Implement Reforms Career & College Ready Standards and Assessments Teaching & Leadership Tech & Data Turnaround Postsecondary Access & Affordability Quality Completion Early childhood Preschool-12 College Career Education Reform efforts in President Obama’s second term
  • 35.Reforms at work: ESEA flexibility moves away from top-down accountability toward data-driven decisions and expertise at the state and local levels. Early learning: The Obama administration has invested $1 billion in early education, which we know has tremendous impact, through Preschool Development Grants and the Race to the Top – Early Learning Challenge. Supporting 20 states’ work aligning early childhood investments to improve the quality of services and children’s school readiness. Flexibility and early education 35
  • 36.Reforms at work: Investing in Innovation (i3) and Race to the Top (RTT): Investments are helping the U.S. Department of Education, administrators, and educators to learn about innovative and effective strategies that improve achievement and close gaps. Grantees in Tennessee’s Achievement School District and Louisiana’s Recovery School District have reported that federal support was crucial to implementing reforms needed to turn around their lowest-performing schools. RTT Rounds 1 & 2: ~$3.9 billion (11 states and DC) RTT 3: $200 million (7 states) RTT District Rounds 1 & 2: $492 million (21 grantees) i3: More than $1 billion Innovation and improvement 36
  • 37.Reforms at work: College- and career-ready standards: More than 40 states have adopted and are implementing college- and career-ready standards. Standards represent the goals for what students should know and be able to do. Standards are different from curriculum, which means what teachers teach, and how. Federal policies encourage states to adopt high standards, but do not touch on curriculum, which is a state and local matter. States choosing to move toward higher standards will create long-term improvements in our nation’s education system. High expectations 37
  • 38.Reforms at work: Higher education: The Obama administration is expanding post-secondary access and affordability. Shifted more than $60 billion in savings to students, including $40 billion into Pell Grants, to make college more affordable for low-income students Fifty percent more students are attending college on Pell Grants (to nearly 9 million) Introduced tools to increase transparency and support student/family choice Pay as You Earn enables eligible students to cap student loan repayments at 10 percent of monthly income First in the World Fund will provide $75 million to spur and evaluate strategies to improve educational outcomes and make college more affordable College access and affordability 38
  • 39.Education and the economy: One of the most important elements of strengthening our nation’s economy is education. Basically every economic improvement we will make depends on having a well-educated workforce. Here’s where America stands now: Six years after the Great Recession, due to the policies the Obama administration has pursued and the hard work of the American people, our country’s economy has come back further and faster than almost any other nation. U.S. businesses added 10 million jobs over 55 straight months of job growth – the longest streak on record. An inextricable link 39
  • 40.Education and the economy: Progress since the great recession 40 10% 6%
  • 41.The work ahead: We can’t stop or slow down until all students, everywhere, have the opportunity to be successful. These big changes are hard; but our parents, teachers, and students are all deeply committed to working harder and doing even better.  Where do our progress and our challenges lead us? 41
  • 42.Cradle to college and career Please see the additional slide deck “booklets” in this 13-part presentation for more information about needs and efforts in these areas: Quality Early Learning K-12 Education Teachers & Leaders STEM Education Turnaround Schools Safe Schools Standards & Assessments Technology & Data College Affordability & Completion Ladders of Opportunity 42 Improving education across the spectrum